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Fast Fashion and Fast Sewing

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Ethical e-tailer Zady took out a one page ad in The Wall Street Journal that beckoned, roused and mobilized the fashion industry.

“Fast Fashion is Fast Food. Empty calories that make us feel full. Factories full of mistreated workers. Rivers full of toxic chemical, closets full of disposable wears. Landfills full of yesterday’s garments. Process matters. Quality matters. Honesty. You’re damn right it’s a call to action.”

They nailed it.

As an 18-year-old, I was a morally neutral zealot of clothing. I didn’t care about a garment’s provenance or fiber make-up. All I cared about was if I had an outfit to wear for the weekend, regardless if plans were in place. Even into my twenties, I never second-guessed my gluttony. I simply enjoyed the delight of dressing up.

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I didn’t experience a rapid U-turn. Rather, it was fusion of many elements that put me into my current headspace. As I dug deeper into the world of sewing, I slowly realized the craftsmanship that goes into making a garment. Holy shit, it takes an apt artist to put together a shirt or pair of pants that fits well and looks good. Also, leading ladies I considered fashion’s mightiest didn’t have a bulging wardrobe, but a refined closet composed of a select number of silhouettes and colors. Also, the rate of fashion trends is exhausting to keep up with, and eventually, I was pleading for a slower pace. Finally, in January, Colette’s Wardrobe Architect, gave me the tools to finally do exactly what I always wanted, which was to create a unique and effective wardrobe.

But many people replace one addiction with another, and as the percentage of my wardrobe becomes more handmade, I have to be careful that I don’t become ravenous for fabric, notions and patterns the way I was for Forever 21 clothes. I don’t want to replace a fast fashion addiction with a fast sewing addiction. A mid-century, well-dressed woman thought about what she wore as much as she thought about her husband because she knew it was a representation of herself and her values. You are what you eat? You are what you wear. There’s something unique and cool about a “considered” your daily attire.  But consideration takes time and planning. I can’t be eaten in one serving, so don’t become gluttonous.

Fast fashion and fast sewing. Don’t replace on with the other. That’s all I have to say about that.

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65 Comments

  1. Reply

    Marilla Walker

    My thoughts exactly! I have been thinking a lot about fast sewing recently and how I approach my future makes. There is a lot of fast sewing out there, but it’s an easy trap to fall into and mass consumption is a difficult cycle to break. So many bad habits need to be broken!

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      Amen!

  2. Reply

    Mary Danielson

    Interesting post, Maddie! I think it’s important to be thoughtful in our own creative endeavors, especially sewing, as we move further along in them. In the beginning, it’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of Making All The Things, but over time I’ve found restraint is the better part of valor in sewing. Why sew something quick, when it won’t be worn or loved as much as a thoughtful piece?

    All that being said, I think lionizing well-dressed mid-century women for their wardrobe curation is a dangerous slope. Yes, they were more thoughtful and cognizant of their appearances, but the reasons behind that are not so simple. When women are treated as objects by society–to be put on pedestals, to be nice and pretty and soft and fashionable only–of course, they’re going to take time with their appearances. We’ve lost some things with the strides women have made, but they were worth it, even the loss of thoughtful dressing. Is it something to revive, in the quest for more Earth-friendly living? Definitely, for both men and women. However, I do think we must be careful about romanticizing the history of women’s domesticity. It’s a subject that’s shockingly dark, for all the perfectly coordinated outfits that came out of it. Or, perhaps, that’s just all those Gender Studies classes of mine talking. 😉

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      Yes, we need to be careful not to romanticize a time when women weren’t treated well, but we can take a few sartorial lessons from them because, damn, they had it right when it came to daily attire!

      P.S. Wonderful comment 🙂

      • Reply

        Natasha Estrada

        But I think we have abandoned the role at our peril. Now we feed little Johnny Lunchables and shop at H&M and feel proud of ourselves.

    • Reply

      Heather Lou

      Mary, I love you. Let’s meet up someday and talk feminism, please! (Former Women’s Studies Major ova here).

      • Reply

        Maddie

        Make sure you invite me too!

        • Reply

          devra

          i love all of these comments. i sometimes wonder if enough of us don’t talk about what we are doing through the lens of our woman/personhood. we are such a thriving and diverse community of WOMEN in addition to being artists/creators and have so many conversations waiting to be held.

          • Maddie

            Another great comment!

    • Reply

      Ally Mariko

      Can I get a, “what what”?! Love this! Feminist to the core yo.

  3. Reply

    Sara

    But sometimes being a bit excessive is a necessary component of creativity! I have paired down my wardrobe, but still have a large fabric stash. If I didn’t have a stash, I’d be very unlikely to find what I need for every project, because the fabric shops around here are not very well stocked. Same thing with notions. I buy most of my fabric at the market, and they are mostly factory samples and remnants, so very unpredictable. At least I’ve gotten to know my needs better over time and buy fabric I’m likely to use now, not just what hits my fancy.

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      I believe there is a difference between purchasing in bulk or a little more and an addiction. How much someone acquires or has depends on the person, which makes it a blurry line to define, but you have to decipher for yourself.

  4. Reply

    Laura N

    Great post Maddie. I just culled by wardrobe dramatically – to the point where I’ve forced myself to stop, consider my clothing wants and needs and slowly sew a wardrobe that matches.I have been very guilty of hoarding craft materials too, buying without thought. So I’m now working on culling this and donating all the excess to charity!

  5. Reply

    oonaballoona

    i do think i replaced one for the other, for a while…i’m glad i realized it, but i’m also glad i had that phase, because we learn by doing. all those quicker makes were worth it, but at a certain point it’s good to go gourmet!

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      Beautiful metaphor!

  6. Reply

    Ginger

    I agree that it’s easy to become self-righteous about shopping retail and just replacing that addiction with fabric and patterns! I’m trying to take a more considered approach to my wardrobe now that I have the skills to make what I want to wear (unlike when I first started sewing and could only manage something like an a-line skirt). At the same time, sewing is a form of exploration and play for me, so I like to try out new shapes and styles that are new to me. I like to sew something ridiculous now and then because I can and because I like pushing the envelope with my clothes. It might not fit into a well-curated wardrobe, but it’s fun to do!

  7. Reply

    Victoria Beppler

    This really resonates with me. I’m getting to the point in my life where I’m waking up and being drawn to the same clothes (colors, silhouettes, etc.) over and over again. I purged a majority of my wardrobe recently, but I STILL have items that I just never wear. I’m slowly starting to try to curate my closet and tailor the pieces that I sew to it, but that being said the point you make about fast sewing is so relevant. Fast fashion is the very reason I personally am struggling with the size of my wardrobe and the percentage of clothing I don’t even like/wear. I definitely do not want to put myself in a similar situation down the road as a result of fast sewing.

    Thanks for the wonderful post! 🙂

  8. Reply

    Lady ID

    Oh gosh – I’ve been thinking about that lately. I have no room in my closet which is filled with clothes I do like. I know the clothes I hardly wear but find it hard to get rid of them because I made them or I have an attachment to them.

    Yet I am sewing so I need to give things away. I tend to prune on a consistent basis but I want to be more aggressive in whittling down to only the fabulous in design and/or fit.

    My fabric stash is pretty sizeable though and I sew to learn and explore 🙂

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      Whittle, baby, whittle!

  9. Reply

    Stephanie

    I took part in the 6 items challenge a couple of years ago and it really mad me think about fast fashion and what i actually need in my wardrobe versus what I want. The challenge is basically to choose 6 items from your wardrobe and wear them for 30 days (not including underwear, sportswear etc). I really enjoyed the challenge and actually liked having the reduced wardrobe. Sometimes you want more but actually it doesn’t make you feel good

    When it comes to sewing I try not to buy fabric without a project in mind and try to choose ethical and sustainable fabrics. It can be tricky though. I too almost fell down the rabbit hole of buying ALL the patterns and fabric! But I try to hold back a little now and think what do I need and what will I wear

    • Reply

      Maddie Flanigan

      That’s sounds like a really interesting challenge (wearing 6 items for 30 days). I’ve whittled down my wardrobe and have come to the same conclusion. We don’t need as much as we think we do.

  10. Reply

    EmSewCrazy

    Very thought provoking post! Thanks!

  11. Reply

    Crab&Bee

    This is a topic near and dear to my heart, and I’m excited you’ve created a conversation about it. I already know I want to use sustainable, durable fabrics and sew mindfully by using good techniques and choosing projects that will (mostly) see a lot of wear. But lately, I’ve also been wondering about the emotional component behind our intense want of new things, whether they be rtw clothing, finished sewing projects or sewing supplies. It’s easy to want to blame ourselves, blame others, or blame retailers for the situation we’re in but I think we may need to look deeper into the “why” behind our consumption.

    I’ve been through a few cycles during which my buying and sewing fluctuates, and I’m pretty sure it depends on how comfortable I’m feeling with my life. I just started a new job and I noticed a lot of pattern and fabric (thrifted, but still) purchases creeping in, even though I know I’m truly happiest with less, and I think it’s because I’m adjusting to the idea of less time for myself.

    One factor in fast sewing that sticks out to me is about how the sewing community connects – it seems like there’s nothing more compelling than a finished project. But maybe that’s just due to my lack of imagination – I look at and enjoy a lot of “finished object” posts but some of my all-time favorites are about techniques and construction. I like the idea of exploring ways to connect with each other outside of sharing a new finished project.

    • Reply

      juliana calado

      beautifully put. 🙂

  12. Reply

    The Tiny Tailoress

    What a great post ! I’ve been thinking about fast sewing a lot lately so I’m happy you started this conversation. I’ve just reached the point where my sewing is good enough to make durable clothes, and I’ve learnt lots of couture techniques which means sewing a garment can take me quite a while. On the other hand, I’ve been caught deep into the online sewing community, (made of wonderful people btw) and that just drives me crazy sometimes ! So many places to be : blogs, instagram, kollabora, pinterest … So many finished projects to admire, so many patterns you want to acquire, so many fabrics and supplies you wish you owned. Even though I drafted a smart and precise plan to work on my wardrobe effectively, thinking ahead colors shapes and materials, sometimes I feel really frustrated and think ‘Damn, this is not enough! I want more ! ’ Which is silly really, because my sewing convictions are into better fitted, more durable, and less clothing… I need to define my pace regardless of internet’s crazy whirl. I think it is the hardest task i’ve ever faced since I’ve started sewing and blogging. I also wanted to tell you there’s something really peaceful and quiet about your blog that I love and helps me stay true to my beliefs. 🙂

    • Reply

      Maddie

      We’ve all fallen into the trap of feeling a need to make it all. I’ve been a victim of this and loaded up commitments that I can’t realistically commit to. I end up saying no after I’ve said yes, and I hate that because I feel like I let people down. It’s a continuing process, but I have learned to separate myself from others. I go into a bubble and only worry about me – Maddie. Just because someone else makes a pattern, doesn’t mean you have to. Does it fit into your sewing wardrobe? Will it expand your sewing skills? My ongoing goal is to become a better seamstress and if a project doesn’t fit in with that, I toss it in the trash. Period. It sounds selfish, but I end up with a me-made wardrobe that is exactly me.

      • Reply

        juliana calado

        sounds very reasonable, actually.!

  13. Reply

    juliana calado

    Maddie,
    This you are saying is a real concern of mine. One of my activities is cooking, and with foods I go radical with my choices(organic, where does it come from, etc etc).
    Sewing is something I have been restarting after a long period of no-time and no-disposition, and it has been really hard to stick to my principles when buying for fabrics and even choosing what I want to make. But most of all, finding the right supplies while not trespassing my principles, has been a really hard position. I live in Brazil, in São Paulo, but the way fabric stores and such are organized around here revolves mostly fast-fashion ways. We actually have a similar to sweatshops scheme going on here, with many chinese, korean and southamerican workers. When I go looking for fabric, seller don’t really give information as to where did it come from, or how was it made. Mostly they don’t know, I guess. When I look it up on the internet, I can’t find places that sell small amounts of products I can trust, they just deal with big companies and major designers. So, I might deal with my choices and concise wardrobe, but for the chemicals and attention about good employers and respect for workers and environment, I can just hope… Because I cant buy millions of yards of organic fabric, and I can’t be spending loads of dollars bringing it from outside.
    I hope this all can be understood, when it comes to deeper subjects my english can be a bit precarious.
    But well, this all I write also to say it’s great knowing we are not alone on our quest for making the world a better place 😉

    i love the way you write, great post.

    • Reply

      Maddie

      This is interesting! I never thought about the obstacles people in other countries face when planning their self-stitched wardrobe. Thanks for sharing! In a situation like yours, I would weigh my options based on importance and value. Could you give up your belief and commitment to organic so that you could sew what you want?

    • Reply

      French Toast Tasha

      I agree, when you get down to trying to buy ethical/sustainable fabric it can be hard! But I do think that just by asking questions like where did this come from and who made it, we are making a little difference, letting the people selling the fabric know that someone cares about these things. I have found a few sources for organic fabric here in the US, but not sure if any would ship to Brazil. Send me a message if you’d like a list of what I have come up with, just in case. There are a few small companies starting up on Etsy selling organic and fair trade fabrics as well.

      I do think that more and more companies are getting interested in sustainable fabric, and that as more people start and continue to sew their own clothes, more and more of us will be asking these questions, looking for fabric we feel good about, that will last the life of a good garment. That will be fantastic! Good luck.
      PS Your English is perfectly adequate!

      • Reply

        Maddie

        So nice of you to offer to help Juliana get fabric. And I agree, her English is great!

      • Reply

        juliana calado

        y’all, I am so glad you understand me well! 😀
        so, I would really appreciate this list of yours. my email, if you please, is: jumliana [at] gmail [dot] com
        After this discussion, and with Mabel and Nettie sewalong starting, I dove deep on the www to find alternatives to this problem. I found a few alternatives for fabrics(knits, more specifically), not organic, but at least made in Brazil. I feel really bad buying fabric from China or wherever, places so far I can not really imagine how it was made or if people have decent conditions, and so on.
        I would like to point out that of course there are a few companies and designers over here that are also doing their share of preserving nature and concerning about employees well being. But mainly, things organic or slightly not-so-very harmful are really hard to find, and when it’s not overpriced it’s just impossible to acquire as a normal citizen – as in not being a company.
        I do think practicing DIY(sewing, or whatever) is already a good step towards change, as you said, and taking an atitude of asking more, and giving preference to what’s more adequate will accumulate for a change in the future. But I also believe this change I won’t see, for people over here are way more focused on other issues. Even among my friends, I am seen as exaggerated and overly demanding. In fact, people concerned about these topics here are exceptions.
        Sorry for writing so much, Maddie, this subject is dear to me.
        I have presented my thoughts entirely, though. Will shut up 🙂

  14. Reply

    Tasha @ By Gum, By Golly

    This is a really interesting post. I was never much a huge consumer of fast fashion, as I’ve been wearing at least half second-hand/vintage pieces probably for the last decade or so (and started thrifting in high school, thanks to good skills passed to me from my mom). It frustrated me when I first started to sew that I’d purchase fabric on a whim, but then maybe not have any idea what to make with it as my skills or tastes changed a bit later. I hated that feeling of just having “stash” for stash sake, if that makes any sense.

    Only in the last 6 or so months have I really nailed down what I enjoy wearing most and sewing most, and my fabric purchases are very specific now. But that wasn’t always the case, so it’s a real feeling of sewing happiness. I try to buy the least amount of yardage I can get away with as I hate to waste, I wear the heck out of everything I make (and if I don’t, I actively examine why not so that I don’t make that mistake again), and while I absolutely can get caught up in “It’s so pretty omg I must have that fabric!!” I know now what to buy that will get turned into a garment I love and wear, and what I only want to admire from afar. I try to be mindful of my purchases and work towards making sure if it comes into my stash, it goes out as a garment I’ll wear and love. Fortunately, I’m now at a place where that’s much easier for me, although of course I’m not perfect by any means (and my sewing tastes could evolve again and then I’ll be back a step). I think being aware about what you consume is important to think about and discuss for all of us who create!

    • Reply

      Maddie

      Did you invade me head because those are my thoughts exactly! It has only been in the last 6 months that I’ve nailed down what I like to wear and sew.

      You brought up an interesting topic. Obviously, our style will change as we age and mature, but do we have to go back to step one and redefine our wardrobe when we make a jump from one generation to another? Or is there an easier way to evolve?

  15. Reply

    Heather Lou

    I’ve slowed down a lot (primarily because I have. No. Time). I think a lot of peeps slow down once they learn great techniques and want to take their time. I certainly am much more methodical about what I make these days. That said, I have no judgement whatsoever for people who make a lot. Some folks just work fast and always like having a project on the go.

    I have noticed that my appetite for clothing has been tempered by the amount of time I have to sew for myself. I’ve had to “make do” with my existing wardrobe. I’ve only made a handful of non-Nettie things for myself this year. And its been a really good exercise to not constantly want to wear the “new” thing. The “new” thing (if its a dress at least) rarely gets worn often if I’m banging out one every week. I have a wedding this weekend – normally I would have made a dress for the occasion. Instead, I’m going to pull out a silk dress I’ve had a for a few months. I love it. its beautiful, and it deserves to be worn more than once or twice.

    • Reply

      Maddie

      “It’s been a really good exercise to not constantly wear the ‘new’ thing.”

      I love that quote, and that is what my quest is all about. I’m challenging myself to not search for the new, but find the right pieces, the excellent fit and the perfect color for me. Once I find this, and it will evolve as I age, I will be freed of trends and what’s hip. And you know what else? I’ll probably look better than all the “hip” and “cool” fashion girls. You can’t beat individual style.

  16. Reply

    Amanda Russell

    This is such a good point, and I can relate. When I first started sewing I wanted to sew everything new that came out because I was so enthusiastic about making, but there was little thought put into what I would actually WEAR and what would look good on me. Both of those things have to be considered when making a personal wardrobe. Not that I’ve ever been a fast sewer but it’s more about avoiding the fast mentality than fast in the literal sense for me 🙂 Now I’ve slowed down considerably, and I put a lot more thought into each piece I make. I spend more on fabrics I REALLY love and take more time choosing styles and perfecting fit. It’s still a journey but I’m on the right path 🙂

    • Reply

      Maddie

      Well, that makes two of who are slow sewers! I used to hate this about myself, but you know what I’ve come to realize? Being “slow,” which is just a matter of perspective, lends itself to taking more time. If I was a faster seamstress, I’d be more inclined to fall into the trap of fast sewing.

      • Reply

        Amanda Russell

        Absolutely 100% my sentiments exactly!! My only lament is that my dreams and ideas come much faster than I can sew them – haha! ^_^

  17. Reply

    House Of Pinheiro

    Love this, well said my friend

  18. Reply

    carrieinstitches

    I have been thinking about this too! It is one of the reasons I started my blog so I could be more thoughtful about and document what I have sewn. Sometimes I want to make so many things and have so many ideas it makes me feel crazy! And yes, I end up with things I don’wear. I am still learning so it is okay with me to be a little speedy at the moment, but my goal in the next year or so is to definitely slow down and be thoughtful about my sewing and creating. Thanks for the great post!

  19. Reply

    Debbie

    What a great and thought provoking post. Recently I have been thinking along these lines as well. Am I just replacing fast fashion with items that I whip up ( to be up to date on some blog or other!) with not too much thought? I have been meaning to go through the Wardrobe Arcitect series and define my style and hopefully refine my sewing. You have motivated me to get started on that right away!

    • Reply

      Maddie

      I can’t encourage you enough to join The Wardrobe Architect. It was a huge help for me, and I think Sarai did a great job looking at the psychological aspects of style.

  20. Reply

    Pauline alice

    That’s a great post Maddie! I think we’ve all been there at the beginning of our sewing journey, (at least I know I’ve been!) where you want to make every cute pattern available and buy every fabric you like, even if you know you’ll never wear it.
    But now I know what I like to wear so I don’t feel the pressure to make everything. I actually like to take time and think about a project, even if that means I won’t be making so many garments. It also happens that I don’t have time to sew anything else than the tests for my patterns…

    • Reply

      Maddie

      In my own experience, once I started to define my style (with the help of The Wardrobe Architect, and I’m sure it will evolve as I mature), that’s when I really slowed down and thought about what I sew and what I buy and how they all fit together.

  21. Reply

    Amy

    Great conversation starter, Maddie. I didn’t grow up with fast fashion or shop that way, but I can understand how “fast anything” is possible because we have so much global information and inspiration constantly rolling about us. So much more than the ladies of yore. I definitely get “addicted” to information. I’ve been really trying to balance my intake and have a limit on social media and blogs, for example. This helps me to edit and appreciate subjects on a deeper level, which also in turn impacts how I accumulate “things” or even relationships. On the other hand, when I’m first learning something, I tend to accumulate a lot of ideas, books, things. Then it reaches a sort of critical max, where I slow down and find my real focus. I think it’s all a process to get to that place of enjoying what you’re learning and creating *right now*.

  22. Reply

    Natasha Estrada

    The Wardrobe Architect isn’t that revolutionary if you’ve been around long enough. It used to be the core of the home economics curriculum. If fact the gutting of the home ec system is one of the core issues behind both the fast fashion movement and the obesity epidemic (though the movement of the meal away from the kitchen table)

    Feminism really did use a big disservice on that issue. I don’t really want to be the same/equal I like the things that make me special. Sewing and cooking for my husband. Best feeling in the world and it doesn’t make me any less for loving it so.

    • Reply

      Maddie

      If heard this argument several times since I began heralding The Wardrobe Architect – that what Sarai did is not new. It’s not new to you, but it is to me. I went to a high school where home ec didn’t exist, even for jocks. So, in my opinion, Sarai brought back something has has been lost, and I thank her for that.

      • Reply

        Natasha Estrada

        Well you know where I sit on a lot of things. A colleague and I had been lamenting the fact that people do longer credit their work. We see a lot of old ideas gussied up and presented as if they are new and revolutionary.

        The origination bias.

        Also remember that fast fashion is a very new concept to. I would pinpoint the start to about 2002 when quotas and tariffs were listed. Forever 21 was a much smaller chain back then. It took until 2005 to really start to build and when the recession start that’s where it really became intrench.

        So it’s not so far gone that we can’t come back from it. The problem is that once a set of prices are set are entrenched in your head it’s hard to convince yourself to pay more. Honestly no significant item of clothing should cost less than $40 yet you can buy boots for that price. And you shouldn’t it’s not a good use of any kind of resource.

        • Reply

          Maddie

          Natasha, you’re good. I can’t argue with any of that 🙂

          • Natasha Estrada

            Fashion is what your offered style is what you wear.

            I like to think they I sew developing my styles as if they were my line but in reality I am a peaches and potatoes sewer. Fancy jackets and basic knitwear.

          • Maddie

            If you’re peaches and potatoes, what I am? I sew lingerie and dress, and sometimes buy wedding dresses. Steak, whipped cream and a side of wine and cheese?

          • Natasha Estrada

            Creme Broiche and Filet

    • Reply

      meredith

      Can I just say, it’s awesome to love sewing and cooking. I sure do! But I have to strongly resist blaming the “obesity epidemic” on working women (the move of the meal away from the kitchen table, as you say) for a few reasons. One, only some kinds of mid-century women were able to stay home all day; plenty of women still had to work, even then… they just also had a second shift of household work on top of wage-earning work. Second, adult men also have agency – they’re not children, and they’re capable of cooking/other household work, too. It’s hardly fair to blame women for something that is a complicated issue (the agricultural industry and the current model of education & the workplace have a lot to answer for as well), and it’s equally unfair to infantilize men by treating them as outsiders in the domestic sphere. Frankly, I love cooking, knitting, and sewing (yes, even for my husband)… but I’m glad that’s a choice i can make rather than an obligation or life sentence.

      • Reply

        Natasha Estrada

        Actually if you read my statement very carefully there is no mention of working women. Girls AND boys don’t learn the basics of cooking and nutrition through the home ec causing food preparation to move away from the home.

        The current model of education i.e no home economics is a direct result of the feminist movement because of what they felt it represented and its a damn shame because we now have 2 generations now that don’t know how to cook or take care of themselves.

        Obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other nutritional based disease ARE a life sentence.

        Be careful not to spin other peoples words to fit your own agenda.

        • Reply

          meredith

          It’s true you didn’t mention working women directly; I was reading between the lines. When I mentioned the education system, I was also thinking about the fact that school days are long and students are expected to sit still for great lengths of time. The gutting of recess and physical ed. is a big factor in our cultural shift. I disagree with your assertion that feminism ended home economic, though — this article (http://bitchmagazine.org/article/what-happened-to-home-economics-history-feminism-education) other reasons for the sjift, and also mentions a potential new means of getting cooking related curriculum back in schools.

          It seems unlikely that we’ll agree on this, but I wanted to offer a counyerpoint / alternate view to the discussion. Having said my bit, I’ll stop hijacking Maddie’s lovely blog and I wish you a good day!

          • Natasha Estrada

            You might enjoy the new documentary Katie Couric produced called Fed Up. It addresses the inactivity issue. However activity alone won’t dig you out of the obesity hole but it will stop you from falling in.

            I’m very firmly on Michael Pollan’s side of the issue. Bitch magazine is not an unbiased publication so naturally it’s going to be in defense of feminism

            When I took home ec it was compulsory in New Zealand to take 4 years of home ec. Boys and girls. 2 in middle school 2 in high school. Usually halfway through your parents would expect you to cook at least one meal a week. My brother did an awesome sweet and sour pork and some amazing ginger biscuits.

            I’m very sad about the demise of home ec because I originally wanted to teach it. They call it consumer science now though.

            Maddie I think you would have loved home ec 😀

          • Maddie Flanigan

            I would have aced it!

  23. Reply

    Sien trytodiy.tumblr.com

    I’ve only been sewing for a year and looking back, I’m surprised at how many things I’ve made, especially considering how busy I am as a University student. But with the exception of one skirt I made out of stiff curtain fabric, I’ve been wearing my own clothes quite a lot. Because I’m so busy, I spend a lot of time thinking about my projects before I actually make them, so I’m less likely to spend what little time I have on something I’m not going to wear.

    Sewing has made me more conscious about shopping, too. I often think:”I could make that myself”, which makes it hard for me to buy that item. I don’t often end up making it anyway, so that probably means I didn’t really need it.

  24. Reply

    Ally Mariko

    I know this is an old post (is this bad blogging manners to comment on an old post??) but I just wanted to say what you are describing is something I had to CATCH myself in! I really valued the Wardrobe Architect too, and mostly because it forced me to know myself better! To be purposeful in the things I make and my expressions of self. I make so that what I wear is as holistic reflection as possible of all the good/crazy/messy/happy/impatient pieces of ME! I think for me, any reminder or invitation to do more self reflection and exploration, (new, old, recycled, mouldy) is something I am TOTALLY DOWN FOR. And I mean, I get to do it while sewing. Double. Score.

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