Patternmaking: How To Make A Pattern Petite

chart1 Patternmaking: How To Make A Pattern Petite
I recently participated in a Instagram photoshoot where I and several other women modeled petite clothing. As I was having my photo taken, I thought, “how are normal patterns converted for petites? Maddie, you know this. You know this!” I did know this and it’s because somewhere over the past seven years, I got my hands on a chart that showed how widths and length were reduced for petite woman. During one of my moves to Philadelphia, to Savannah, to Miami, or during one of my sewing projects, I shoved it in a folder, book, or binder somewhere and now I had to find it. So that weekend, at the top of my to-do list was to find this chart. I retraced my steps and mentally backtracked until, AHA!, I found it! Every petite woman is petite in her own, unique way and these are standard reductions but I’ve used them as guidelines when working on my own patterns or helping petite women who email me with questions.

What is petite and who fits into this category? Well, let’s take a step back and define what is “normal” or “regular.” Regular female clothing is designed for a woman at least 5 ft 5 in (165 cm) tall (without shoes). Therefore, petite female clothing is designed to fit women of shorter height, typically less than 5 ft 3 in (160 cm) or 5 ft 4 in. Regular women’s clothing will not fit a petite woman because vertical measurements such as front length, back length, bust to waist, sleeve lengths, and leg inseam lengths are shorter and must be altered significantly to fit well. Unfortunately, non-petite clothing cannot be altered to be petite without introducing an unsightly seam, which is why the pattern, and not the garment, must be changed. In most cases, changing a pattern to be petite calls for width reductions as well but that’s not always the case. A women is an XL petite would need to add width. Therefore, some critical thinking must be done when using this chart – what applies to you and where? Again, this is a guideline (but a useful one!).

tags: Pattern Making Comments: 24

24 Comments
  1. Kirsty Maurits

    Interesting! What exactly is the definition of petite? I’m quite short (5’1″) but um, not very slim. I’ve worn Petite XL clothes before, but I wondered if the standard reductions you listed are more for height adjustments or weight adjustments, if that makes sense?

    Reply
    • Maddie Flanigan

      You are correct – the reductions are mostly for height adjustments. You sort of have to compare your “petite-ness” and compare it with the chart. Are you more petite in width or in length?

      Reply
      • Kirsty Maurits

        I’m definitely more petite in length, I think. Thanks for the response :)

        Reply
        • Natasha Estrada

          Think of petiteness as being a bone structure issue. Even if you add extra flesh to your petite frame you’ll still have to do some sort of adjustment to things like bodice length and shoulder width. Maybe even more so since as sizes get graded up to fit your circumference the things that were to big to begin with get even bigger. The orange peel effect.

          Reply
  2. Shel

    Cool, as a petite plus I will take circ measures with a grain of salt, but most of these seem to deal with length which is great. I’m 5′. I echo Kirsty’s question about plus considerations. : )

    Reply
  3. Trish

    thanks for this! I saw this over on Kollabora and being 4’10 (& 3/4″) I am always having pattern issues. I’m usually a PP, but sometimes even that size is too large. I’ll be referring back to this chart for sure!

    Trish
    http://www.minipip.typepad.com/

    Reply
  4. Erica

    Altering patterns is something I’m working on now. I love having so much control over how the finished garment fits my body. I’m not exactly petite in height, but often have to take garments in at the hips a lot.

    Reply
  5. Pingback: Freebie: Petite pattern alterations conversion chart | Sewing | CraftGossip.com

  6. LisaSmallThings

    Thanks for sharing, this is interesting!

    Reply
  7. Erin

    Oooh! This is great – thank you! I’m petite (5’2) and I’ve found I struggle with the fit on most patterns. It’s kinda ridiculous – my bust measurement isn’t even on the size chart for Colette Patterns! :)

    Reply
  8. Mary Carroll

    Thank you so much! I am petite in height and have an hourglass shape. My measurements indicate a proportionate petite figure. I have worked out some of the alterations through trial and error, but am now becoming more particular with my fitting. This will help!

    Reply
  9. oonaballoona

    aaah! and i just saw your sewing news section– i love it!!

    Reply
    • Maddie Flanigan

      if only Disqus had likes and hearts – I would triple like your comment!

      Reply
  10. lisa g

    even though i’m definitely not petite (5’8″) i have to do petite adjustments from shoulder to bust otherwise necklines are way too low and darts are all sorts of wrongly placed… great chart!

    Reply
  11. Pingback: Freebie: Petite pattern alterations conversion chart | Sewing Patterns

  12. Goodbye Valentino

    Thanks so much for sharing the petite chart! I find this particularly helpful for shaping the upper bodice and shoulders since patterns generally include petite alterations for the length only.

    Reply
  13. sewingtidbits

    Ooooh this is great!! I usually stop at armhole and bodice length… I wish there was more petite-ready patterns out there, that took into account that petite is not synonymous with shapeless! I LOOOOOVE the sewing news thingie!!!

    Reply
  14. June

    Oh, interesting! As someone who is not quite 5’4″, I thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  15. Britta

    thanks a lot for the size chart! :)

    Reply
  16. Pingback: Free Sewing Patterns: Women’s Clothing | married to a bmw

  17. Le monde des petites

    Thanks for the chart, it will be very hepful!

    Reply
  18. Dee

    From what size are these conversions made? A regular size 8/M?? Newbie patternmaker here :)

    Reply

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